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Bright Sheng

Publisher: G. Schirmer

Tibetan Dance (2001)
Publisher
G Schirmer Inc
Category
Works for 2-6 Players
Sub Category
Piano Trio
Year Composed
2001
Duration
15 Minutes
Orchestration
Availability


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   Score and Part(s)

Programme Note
Bright Sheng Tibetan Dance (2001)
Composer Note:

Tibetan Dance was written in October 2000. The work was commissioned by Michigan State University for the Verdehr Trio, to whom the work is also dedicated. The work is anchored on the last movement, the longest of the three. The first two movements are reminiscent, as if one is hearing songs from a distant memory, and the music becomes real in the last movement. The music material is based on the rhythm and melodic motive of a Tibetan folk dance from Qinghai, a Chinese province by the border of Tibet, where I lived during my teenage years.

—Bright Sheng

  • Ensemble
    Verdehr Trio
    Soloist(s)
    Walter Verdehr, violin; Elsa Ludewig-Verdehr, clarinet; Silvia Roederer, piano
    Crystal Records:
Performances
Date
Title
  • 05 OCT 2010
    LeFrak Hall, New York, NY
    CUNY
    Blanca Gonzales, violin, Charles Neidich, clarinet, and Brigtht Sheng, piano
  • 22 JAN 2010
    New York, NY
    Barge Music
    Verdehr Trio
  • 07 MAR 2007
    Cleveland Institue of Music, Cleveland, OH
    Verdehr Trio
  • 03 FEB 2007
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
    Verdehr Trio
  • 07 AUG 2006
    Saratoga Chamber Music Festival
    Saratoga Springs, NY

Reviews
These chamber works show Sheng as a skilled and expressive composer, who very effectively communicates with his listeners...these scores leave a powerful impression on the audience, and combine Chinese and Western music elements to expand their expressive vocabulary. The listeners at the concert were suitably impressed; Sheng seems to have struck the right chord.
James Hennerty, The Albany Times Union,1/1/0001
Tibetan Dance [is] comprised of three movements inspired respectively by a Japanese garden, a folk hymn know as “Cabbage,” and a Tibetan folk dance....The trio’s “Prelude” began with a simple, serene music, pleasantly strange....The middle movement, “Song,” was slow and somewhat minimalist, just the violin and clarinet creating the mood. The work was named for its final movement, which was alive with dance rhythms knocked by Juillet’s fist on her violin and Sheng’s on the piano’s upper ledge. Morales’ clarinet bleated and blared above Sheng’s low register piano boogey, and Juillet’s part included a pattern of foot stomps. It was fun music...
Judith White, The Saratogian,1/1/0001
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